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Mid-Autumn Festival 2019

Mid-Autumn Festival in Taiwan – September 13, 2019

The Mid-Autumn Festival is a Chinese harvest festival, also celebrated in Taiwan. It falls on the 15th day of the 8th lunar month in the traditional Chinese calendar. It is an official public holiday in Taiwan, as well as China, Macau, and Hong Kong.

The festival is known by many names, such Harvest Moon Festival, Mooncake Festival, and Reunion Festival. It celebrates three fundamental concepts that have shaped the traditions of the festival, Gathering: family and friends come together to celebrate and harvest crops, Thanksgiving: people give thanks for good harvest and Praying: people ask deities for material or conceptual satisfaction, such as health, wealth, babies etc.

The Mid-Autumn Festival has been celebrated for centuries. One of its most important parts is moon worship, as moon symbolizes femininity and fertility. On this day, the Chinese honor Chang-yi, the goddess of the Moon.

Modern celebration of the festival includes family gatherings, traditional lion and dragon dances, lighting lanterns, folk games etc. Probably, the best known tradition is making and sharing mooncakes, small round cakes filled with lotus seed paste or red bean.

The Mid-Autumn Festival is also celebrated in Vietnam, where it is known as Tết Trung Thu or Children’s Festival. It is marked with lantern processions and lion dances.

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Dragon Boat Festival 2019

Dragon Boat Festival in Taiwan – June 7, 2019

The Dragon Boat Festival, often referred to as the Tuen Ng Festival, the Duanwu Festival or the Double Fifth Festival, is a traditional holiday that originates in China. It is celebrated on the 5th day of the 5th month of the Chinese calendar.

The festival is believed to commemorate the death of Qu Yuan, a Chinese poet and minister known for his contributions to classical Chinese poetry as well as his patriotism. Qu Yuan committed ritual suicide as a form of protest against the corruption of the era, drowning himself in the Miluo River.

According to legend, villagers desperately tried to save him, but their attempts turned out futile. So they started to beat drums, splash the water with paddles and throw sticky rice into the river in order to keep fish and evil spirits away from Qu Yuan’s body.

Dragon boat races held during the festival originated from the act of racing to save Qu Yuan or at least retrieve his body from the water. And the balls of sticky rice that were thrown into the water have transformed into zongzi (sticky rice dumplings), traditional food eaten during the Duanwu Festival.

The Dragon Boat Festival is an official public holiday in some Asian countries, such as China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan. It is unofficially celebrated by Chinese communities in Malaysia, Singapore and some other countries in southeast Asia.

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Chinese New Year’s Day 2019

Chinese New Year in Taiwan – February 5 to February 9, 2019

Chinese New Year’s Eve is a national holiday in Taiwan, and it’s hugely celebrated. For 2019, it is the year of the pig.

Chinese New Year 2019 will provide Taiwan with 6 days of a national holiday, from February 5th to 9th. The Chinese New Year is one of the major holidays in Taiwan.

The history celebration of Chinese New Year is very long. It gained special significance due to the myths and traditions. Traditionally the festival was a time to honor ancestors and deities, thus different customs evolved.

Traditionally every family makes the thorough cleansing of the house to sweep away ill-fortune and invite good luck. The families gather on the New Years Eve for the annual reunion dinner, where typical menu includes chicken or pork, dumplings and fish. Windows and doors are decorated with colorful paper-cuts and couplets. Another tradition is giving money in red paper envelopes.

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Chinese New Year’s Eve 2019

Chinese New Year’s Eve in TaiwanFebruary 4, 2019

Chinese New Year’s Eve is a national holiday in Taiwan, and it’s hugely celebrated. For 2019, it is the year of the pig.

Chinese New Year 2019 will provide Taiwan with 6 days of a national holiday, from February 5th to 9th. The Chinese New Year is one of the major holidays in Taiwan.

The history celebration of Chinese New Year is very long. It gained special significance due to the myths and traditions. Traditionally the festival was a time to honor ancestors and deities, thus different customs evolved.

Traditionally every family makes the thorough cleansing of the house to sweep away ill-fortune and invite good luck. The families gather on the New Years Eve for the annual reunion dinner, where typical menu includes chicken or pork, dumplings and fish. Windows and doors are decorated with colorful paper-cuts and couplets. Another tradition is giving money in red paper envelopes.

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Double Ninth Day 2018

Double Ninth Day in Taiwan – October 17, 2018

The Chung Yeung Festival (Double Ninth Festival) is a traditional Chinese holiday celebrated only in Taiwan on the ninth day of the ninth lunar month.

The festival is directly related to the philosophical concept of yin and yang, two interconnected aspects that symbolize dark and light, night and day, the moon and the sun, femininity and masculinity, earth and sky, water and fire, accordingly.

According to Chinese tradition, nine is a yang number. The double nine (i.e. the 9th day of the 9th month in the Chinese calendar) has too much yang, which is potentially dangerous. Hence, it is customary to perform special rituals that help avoid danger. One can climb a mountain, drink chrysanthemum wine or tea, or wear Cornelian cherry (zhuyu). Cornelian cherry and chrysanthemum are believed to have cleansing and protecting qualities. In China and Hong Kong, many people visit ancestral graves to pay their respects to the deceased.

They clean the grave, leave food offerings, and burn incense sticks. In Taiwan, the Double Ninth Festivals is also known as Senior Citizens’ Day. On this day, citizens of Taiwan demonstrate their care for and appreciation of the elderly.